Learning Update!!!

Reading:

This week in reading, we continued to work on figuring out the tricky words that “stop us in our tracks” as we read our nonfiction books.  We learned to crash the parts of a word together when we encounter a tricky word.  For example, we say can say each part: ex – er – cise and then crash the parts together: exercise.  Another strategy we learned is to do a S-L-O-W check, by running our finger slowly under the word, to make sure it looks right and sounds right. 

We also started thinking about the meaning of the words in our books.  When we are reading our nonfiction books we are learning new words about our topics.  When we get to one of these new words we can try the word the best we can and then describe what it might mean.  We had lots of fun telling about some of our new words and having our classmates guess what the word might be.

We added to our How to get SUPER SMART about NONFICTION topics chart this week too.  We learned that keywords are words that are used over and over to teach about our topic.  We worked on finding keywords in our books and sharing everything that we know about these words. 

Our first graders are becoming experts on so many topics!!!

Writing:

This week in Writers Workshop, we started a new unit about Nonfiction Writing. We are just at the beginning of the unit but we have already learned so much! First graders are so excited to be teaching about topics that they know a lot about! We began the week by talking about when you write a Nonfiction book, you need to pick a topic that you are an expert about. The way that we do this is first to think of a topic that you know a lot about. Then you plan your pages across your fingers. We want to make sure that we know at least 4 facts about our topic so that we can write those facts across our pages in our books.

After you plan your topic across your fingers, good teachers and writers quickly sketch their plan across the pages in their books so that they don’t forget what they want to write on that page! Once you have sketched you plan then it is time to write the words! 

Inline image 3

We wrapped up writing this week by asking ourselves “How Can I Teach My Reader?” We need to think about who our reader might be and think about the questions they might have about our topic. For example, if we were writing “All About Dogs,” chances are that we would be writing to someone who doesn’t know much about dogs. If one of my facts is Dogs chew bones. My reader might want to know “Why do they eat bone?” or “What kind of bones.” Its our job as the Authors of our books to think about the questions readers might have before we write and answer those questions before our reader has to ask those question.

Inline image 1

Math:

This week, we reviewed how to add two ones numbers together, two tens numbers together, and even a tens and ones number together​. ​This was a snap!!

Screen Shot 2014-02-09 at 5.32.57 PM

Then, we began adding a two-digit number (containing a tens number and a ones number) together with some additional ones. To complete this task, we utilized two strategies. First, our handy-dandy method of counting on:

We had to be extra careful that we counted on accurately.  We made sure that we did this by always going back to double check our work and using our number grids to help us count through the decade numbers. Our second strategy helped us visualize how ones can be grouped together to “make a new ten” – even when we’re working with larger numbers. This method is an introduction to the regrouping strategies that your child will use in second grade and beyond.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.